Hallmarks of Future Sensory Entertainment

While preparing for a presentation at the Beijing Film Academy’s Advanced Innovation Center for Future Visual Entertainment, I considered what I would identify as the hallmarks of future visual entertainment (which could more appropriately be framed as “future sensory entertainment”). Being a fan of the Rule of Three, I settled on the following:

  • Immersive
  • Interactive
  • Intelligent

Of course, I couldn’t stop there (especially once I noticed the “I’s” had it), so I brainstormed “I” words and quickly accumulated these additional hallmarks of future sensory entertainment…(full post on AWN)

Advertisements
Hallmarks of Future Sensory Entertainment

Through the looking glass

image

Dad and Mom are awakened by their scented VR sleep wraps: Dad with a simulated mountain sunrise, and Mom on a peaceful meadow. They change into their daywear – lightweight, hybrid reality designer glasses and haptic smart rings. In the kitchen, Mom browses new breakfast recipes in AR, while Dad parses an AR article on the discontinuation of the world’s last remaining smart phone model, the Freedom 2051. Their preschool Daughter flails through an AR storybook while chatting with her digital imaginary friend (which her parents have secretly configured to be visible to everyone in the family).

Dad prepares to take his pudgy teenage Son to school (brick-and-mortar education made mandatory by the “Present and Accounted For” school attendance bill, passed into law after a spike in childhood obesity). Their trip in the family car starts out in… (full post on AWN)

Through the looking glass

The Three R’s

kevin-geiger-thethreers01

Virtual reality is nothing new.  It’s been around for decades, tent-poled by a few signature eras.  The first of these was in the 1960’s, when Morton Heilig built a prototype of his “Experience Theatre” called the Sensorama, and Ivan Sutherland created the first VR and AR head-mounted-display (HMD) – a massive device that required ceiling suspension.  The second era was during the mid-80’s to mid-90’s, when Jaron Lanier founded VPL ResearchMattel’s VR Power Glove was available for just $75 USD, and the concept of virtual reality was popularized in movies such as THE LAWNMOWER MAN.  We are currently in the third era, a Facebook-fueled frenzy of global activity – leveraging on technological advances and accessibility – that just might achieve mass-market traction where previous attempts have failed.

Although awareness is growing, many people still either don’t know what VR is, or refer to everything as “VR.”  In China, for instance, “VR” is used as a catchall term encompassing virtual reality, augmented reality and mixed reality.  On the other end of the spectrum are the technorati, who debate the fine points of whether 360-degree videos should be called “VR” and whether POKEMON GO qualifies as “true” AR.

In light of this and for your consideration, here are brief explanations of VR (virtual reality), AR (augmented reality) and MR (mixed reality) that I’ve used when describing the technology to… (full post on AWN)

The Three R’s