Through the looking glass

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Dad and Mom are awakened by their scented VR sleep wraps: Dad with a simulated mountain sunrise, and Mom on a peaceful meadow. They change into their daywear – lightweight, hybrid reality designer glasses and haptic smart rings. In the kitchen, Mom browses new breakfast recipes in AR, while Dad parses an AR article on the discontinuation of the world’s last remaining smart phone model, the Freedom 2051. Their preschool Daughter flails through an AR storybook while chatting with her digital imaginary friend (which her parents have secretly configured to be visible to everyone in the family).

Dad prepares to take his pudgy teenage Son to school (brick-and-mortar education made mandatory by the “Present and Accounted For” school attendance bill, passed into law after a spike in childhood obesity). Their trip in the family car starts out in… (full post on AWN)

Through the looking glass

Virtual vision

Jim Stoten VR world

London artist Jim Stoten presents his whimsical take on the future of virtual reality and augmented reality.

I would like to show a futuristic street scene, showing people of the future using virtual reality technology in an everyday way.  Some people will be walking alongside their own projected pet dinosaur.  Some will be talking to hologramatic projections of business colleagues or family members on their telephone — eye projectors.  Some will be playing huge interactive video games on screens the size of buildings, with large VR hands.  Some will be watching TV shows as they walk along.

In a world where people already have very different perceptions of shared realities, it will be fascinating (and possibly frightening) to see the consequences of our ability to experience divergent realities at the same time, in the same place.

Virtual vision