The Apple of your eye

Daniel Eckler’s article, “The Future of Apple & AR,” reiterates that personal computing is on the verge of a paradigm shift toward augmented reality, and notes that Apple’s recent hires, acquisitions and patents point towards this AR future, as does the tech embedded in their current product line (particularly the much-maligned AirPods, which can be properly appreciated as voice-activated computers that nestle in your ears).
Regarding Apple’s prospective AR endeavors, Eckler observes, “If AR glasses are going to be a success, they’ll need to tether with a powerful computer (the iPhone), and they’ll need to do so seamlessly while introducing new ways to interface with computers (Airpods + Siri).”
Yes, AND…

While I share Eckler’s opinion of Apple’s intentions, I believe Apple’s odds of success are predicated as much on the practical as on the technical. In order to achieve mass market AR adoption, Apple must attractively address the following points: (full post on AWN)

The Apple of your eye

My 2017 VR Wish List

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My 2017 VR Wish List is up on Animation World Network. Check it out!

My 2017 VR Wish List

The Three R’s

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Virtual reality is nothing new.  It’s been around for decades, tent-poled by a few signature eras.  The first of these was in the 1960’s, when Morton Heilig built a prototype of his “Experience Theatre” called the Sensorama, and Ivan Sutherland created the first VR and AR head-mounted-display (HMD) – a massive device that required ceiling suspension.  The second era was during the mid-80’s to mid-90’s, when Jaron Lanier founded VPL ResearchMattel’s VR Power Glove was available for just $75 USD, and the concept of virtual reality was popularized in movies such as THE LAWNMOWER MAN.  We are currently in the third era, a Facebook-fueled frenzy of global activity – leveraging on technological advances and accessibility – that just might achieve mass-market traction where previous attempts have failed.

Although awareness is growing, many people still either don’t know what VR is, or refer to everything as “VR.”  In China, for instance, “VR” is used as a catchall term encompassing virtual reality, augmented reality and mixed reality.  On the other end of the spectrum are the technorati, who debate the fine points of whether 360-degree videos should be called “VR” and whether POKEMON GO qualifies as “true” AR.

In light of this and for your consideration, here are brief explanations of VR (virtual reality), AR (augmented reality) and MR (mixed reality) that I’ve used when describing the technology to… (full post on AWN)

The Three R’s

It’s the CONTENT, stupid – Part One

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I’ll let you in on a dirty little secret: nobody wants to “use VR.” People want to be entertained, to shop, to assemble their furniture, to find a good place for dinner, to talk to their family, to create things. The technology is a means to an end. Transformative, perhaps, but a utility nonetheless. Fifteen years ago at Walt Disney Feature Animation, I was reminding our software engineers of this as we worked to develop tools for the traditional animators transitioning to CGI: “Nobody wants to use the computer for the sake of using a computer. People want to write, to draw, to animate, to edit. Our goal is to enable and evolve those activities.” Ironically, by reminding yourself that the technology is not the main event, you better position the technology to become ubiquitous.

VR hardware engineers and software developers must be mindful of this principle if they wish this third wave of VR endeavor to be the one that makes it over the wall. Aside from a vanguard of the few, most ordinary people don’t really care about VR, and… (full post on AWN)

It’s the CONTENT, stupid – Part One